Atmospheric Perspective and Linear Perspective in Art

Atmospheric Perspective

Artist: Annibale Carracci        Image: River Landscape         Year: 1634      Page: 117

Found In: John Olive Hand, River Landscape, 1634, Oil on canvas, Samuel H. Kress Collection, National Gallery of Art, Master Paintings from the Collection. (National Gallery of Art, Washington: 2004), 117.

The artwork River Landscape done by Amibale Carracci is one the good examples of atmospheric perspective. According to dictionary definition atmospheric perspective means “how the appearance of the objects is altered over distance by the effects of the air between the viewer and the object.” (“Atmospheric perspective”)  In this painting we can easily see the decreasing saturation of the colors from foreground to background which is one of the characteristics of atmospheric perspective. The colors of foreground are more saturated than background. The front colors are darker and things are visible properly while at the back ground colors are lighter and at the very end point almost all colors are light blue. We cannot distinguish things properly in background or in the other words we can say that contrast is decreasing in back ground and we cannot see minor details. The background of this artwork is brighter than its foreground. The details in foreground are more visible and there is very much contrast between things, where as in background contrast between object is vanishing and overall color of the artwork is becoming lighter. In this artwork Carracci has used light blue color in the background and we cannot see the clear strict line between the sky, the mountains and the ground. Such kind of backgrounds we usually see in atmospheric perspective.

Linear Perspective

Artist: Bernardo Bellotto        Image: The Campo di SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Venice

Year: 1743/1747        Page: 238

Found In: John Olive Hand, The Campo di SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Venice , 1743/747, Oil on canvas, Widener Collection, National Gallery of Art, Master Paintings from the Collection. (National Gallery of Art, Washington: 2004), 238.

The artwork The Campo di SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Venice by Bernardo Bellotto is an example of linear perspective where artist has used the tactics of linear perspectives of art. For instance, the vanishing point in this artwork is present at the background of the painting between the rows of buildings. The orthogonal lines are emerging from the vanishing point as the buildings are seems to converge into the vanishing point at the background of this artwork. The buildings at the left side of this artwork have a clear angle and it seems that those building are growing smaller and smaller. Near the vanishing point buildings are very small as compared to the foreground of the artwork. In this artwork everything seems to be converging into the vanish point which is located in the middle of artwork at background. Even the tiles on the floor of this painting are growing smaller and smaller towards the vanishing point and the orthogonal on the floor of this painting are very much clearer to notice. Which is one of the characteristics of linear artwork and Bellotto has used it very well in this artwork. We can see that saturation of the colors is pretty much similar in foreground and background, but angles are changed. The whole artwork is seems to be diverged from the central point of the painting.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s